God, last night and the week before, HEROE’s was totally awesome, I am glad that they only showed one part of the characters( i think the writer’s have finally listened to the fans) .   So he is doing all that for his daughters protection HMMM stills seems fishy to me but we will see. Eric Roberts as one of the bosses including Hiro’s Father……Allot of explanations and still with allot of mysteries…..So awesome, hope they keep this up.

 Hiro gets his sword next week yahoo…….i still think that the big boss is Peter’s Brother (that took over for his father). we will soon find out.

 Cannot wait for next week.

 Marcel

Enjoy

For you people that never saw this, I think it is brilliant

Enjoy

I am so happy that heroes are on again tonight….just the mystery of it all is so interesting.

I like the message: that we are all Dormant heroes just waiting to express ourselves (please do not go and try to jump out of a window).

Spoilers Ahead: Don’t read this if you don’t want to know the future of Heroes.

 

 

A new hero appears in Episode 12, the invisible man. Cool. Can’t wait to see how he uses this power. Imagine that.

In case you didn’t read the TV Guide report, his name is Claude and he’s played by Christopher Eccleston a British actor who also has played the role of Doctor Who. In the USA, this episode is set to air January 22.

But the details, errrr speculation (wink), you hear first right here right now. Which is it? Only we know, but take the ride.

Now this hero is supposed to be different. Don’t expect all the fun discovering and learning a new power. He’s got it and uses it with glee, or maybe reluctance. But he’s well practiced having had the power for years and years. He’s like the teacher and the rest of the Hero crew are like students. He knows the utility and risks involved with this power and can show you how to use super-powers with wisdom, grasshopper.

 Here is a link to more spoilers   you decide

I actually new this

Origins:   Next time you’re browsing the supermarket in search of the makings of that night’s dinner, pause a moment to read the ingredients Color bug labels of your favorite red-colored ingestibles and cosmetics. Chances are, you’ll discover a notation for cochineal, carmine, or carminic acid, pigments whose origins might surprise and possibly disgust you.

Cochineal and its close cousin carmine (also known as carminic acid) are derived from the crushed carcasses of a particular South and Central American beetle. These popular colorants, which today are used to impart a deep red shade to fruit juices, gelatins, candies, shampoos, and more, come from the female Dactylopius coccus, a beetle that inhabits a type of cactus known as Opuntia.

Dactylopius coccus was the source of a red dye used by Aztecs and Mexican Indians for centuries before the arrival of the Spaniards. Those indigenous peoples would collect cochineal insects, briefly immerse them in hot water to kill the beasties and dissolve the females’ waxy coating, and then dry them in the sun. The desiccated insects would then be ground to a fine powder.

The Spaniards immediately grasped the potential of the pigment, so these dried insects became one of the first products to be exported from the New World to the Old. Europeans took to the beautiful, bright scarlet colour immediately both for its vibrant hue and for its extraordinary colorfast properties, ensuring that boatloads of cochineal insects would make the trans-Atlantic trek.

Today cochineal has been surpassed as a dye for cloth by a number of synthetic pigments, but is still widely used as a coloring agent for a number of foodstuffs, beverages, and cosmetics (because many of those synthetic dyes proved dangerous to humans when taken internally or allowed to leach into the body through the skin). It takes about 70,000 insects to make one pound of cochineal.

While cochineal is used in a wide variety of foods, it is not found in kosher products because Jewish dietary laws prohibit the inclusion of insects or their parts in food. The “ewww!” factor nothwithstanding, cochineal is a safe food colorant aside from a few rare cases of allergic reaction.

Another red dye used in foods, FD&C Red Dye #40 (alternatively known as Red #40), is often mistakenly assumed to be a euphemism for cochineal or carmine. It’s not — it’s bug-free and is actually derived from coal.

Our distaste at the thought of ingesting bugs is based on cultural factors rather than the properties or flavors of the insects themselves. Western society eschews (rather than chews) bugs, hence the widespread “Ewww!” reaction to the news that some of our favorite foods contain extract of beetle.

I am not eating Jello Again…. 

Sometimes the most Made from contented cows innocuous of foodstuffs contain constituents whose origins are less than appetizing. Such is the case with JELL-O, a dessert that has graced millions of dinner tables since its 1897 debut.

Underneath JELL-O’s jiggly wholesomeness lurks a secret many consumers are disconcerted to learn: JELL-O is made from gelatin, an animal product rendered from the hides and bones of animals.

The production of gelatin starts with the boiling of bones, skins, and hides of cows and pigs, a process that releases the protein-rich collagen from animal tissues. The collagen is boiled and filtered numerous times, dried, and ground to a powder. Because the collagen is processed extensively, the final product is not categorized as a meat or animal product by the federal government. Very strict vegetarians avoid gelatin entirely, but more permissive vegetarians have no problem including JELL-O in their diets.

JELL-O products account for about 80 percent of the gelatin market.

Popular belief has it that gelatin comes from horses’ and cows’ hooves. Kraft, the maker of JELL-O, asserts that hooves do not contain the necessary collagen and therefore are not used in the production of their JELL-O brand gelatin product.

I do not know why, but I am a fanatic of Sinks and Faucets designs, it’s about time designers think out of th box.

ring_faucet3_small.jpegring_faucet2_small.jpegring_faucet_small.jpeg

Ring faucet is about experiencing water in a whole new way in our daily lives –to rediscover the awe-inspiring beauty of water in a small home faucet. This unique faucet visually frames flowing water in a circular fashion, giving you a full view of the water just as it falls over the edge.The opening orifice at the spout end lets in natural light which illuminates the flowing water for a striking view. Water is ‘reinstated’ as a precious element, like a fine diamond. The external form is simple and pure, as befits a faucet that is meant to emphasize the elemental beauty of water. The simple form allows the design to be easily translated into a series of faucets that cater to different settings and requirements. While the design is novel in terms of aesthetics, the sense of comfort in using a familiar domestic fitting is not lost as the faucet is designed to adopt the conventional interface of the hot and cold -handles basin mixer. Moreover, this tripartite arrangement fits in well with large basins and/or vanity tops.

Designer: Sun Liang 

Link